Master of Applied Linguistics - 2018

Postgraduate - Course

Commencement year

This course entry applies to students commencing this course in 2018 and should be read in conjunction with information provided in the 'Faculty information' section of this Handbook by the Arts.

Unit codes that are not linked to their entry in the Handbook are not available for study in the current year.

Course code

A6001

Credit points

96

Abbreviated title

MAppLing

CRICOS code

082651G

Managing faculty

Arts

Coordinator

Dr Howard Manns

Contact details

Tel: 1800 MONASH (1800 666 274) Web address: http://future.arts.monash.edu/master-applied-linguistics/

Admission and fees

Australia

Course type

Specialist
Master by coursework

Standard duration

2 years FT, 4 years PT

This course normally takes 2 years full-time to complete but if you have relevant entry qualifications you may receive credit and be able to complete the course in 1.5 years or 1 year full-time, or part-time equivalent.

Students have a maximum of 6 years to complete this course including any periods of intermission and suspension, and must be continuously enrolled throughout.

Mode and location

On-campus (Clayton)

Off-campus (Clayton)

Award

Master of Applied Linguistics

Alternative exits

Graduate Certificate in Arts

Graduate Diploma in Applied Linguistics

Refer to 'Alternative exits' entry below for further requirements and details.

Description

Applied linguistics is one of the fastest growing fields of study in the humanities and is becoming increasingly recognised for its ability to solve language related problems at a micro and macro level. Professionals who can demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the use of language in varied situations are highly valued in the workplace.

This course offers professionals from a wide variety of disciplines the opportunity to expand their knowledge of how language works in the context of globalisation. You will gain a critical understanding of theoretical and practical issues relating to applied linguistics, including second/foreign language acquisition, language teaching, language contact and intercultural communication.

The course has two specialisations to choose from:

  • Applied Linguistics
  • Teaching world Englishes for international communication.

The applied linguistics specialisation is ideal for a range of professionals, including interpreters, editors, policy makers and health care professionals, in short anyone working with language issues in a multilingual and multicultural context. It is also recommended for teachers of VCE English language, language teachers (including English as a second language) and generalist teachers looking to improve their knowledge of grammar/language structures.

The teaching world Englishes for international communication specialisation is ideal for ESL teachers, policy makers or anyone considering taking up a position teaching/working in a country where English is not the native language of the majority of the population.

In either specialisation you will be able to apply your learning to your own context as part of the assessment process and have the opportunity to complete a research project or internship. The research training in applied linguistics that you will receive, will also equip you as a graduate to make a significant professional contribution to the field.

Specialisations

Applied linguistics

This specialisation is designed to give students a strong understanding of language structures and use across a variety of languages. In the core units, you will explore the sounds and grammar of Australian English and how these differ from other English varieties and other languages around the world. Students also explore how we use language differently according to context and how language varies between different social groups. In elective units you will have the opportunity to specialise in areas such as literacy, second language acquisition or language and identity.

Teaching world Englishes for international communication

This specialisation provides in-depth knowledge of issues surrounding the teaching and use of English as an international language. It explores issues that relate to the socio-cultural, conceptual, and ideological considerations that relate to the spread of English around the world. It addresses issues such as the speaker's identity, teaching of English as an international language, and the use of English as a lingua franca in international professional contexts.

Outcomes

These course outcomes are aligned with the Australian Qualifications Framework level 9 and Monash Graduate AttributesAustralian Qualifications Framework level 9 and Monash Graduate Attributes (http://monash.edu/pubs/handbooks/alignmentofoutcomes.html).

Upon successful completion of this course it is expected that graduates will be able to:

  1. demonstrate critical knowledge of diverse aspects of second/foreign language acquisition, language teaching, language contact and intercultural communication in a range of contexts
  2. articulate and apply an understanding of world view best practice in the field of applied linguistics and associated challenges and debates
  3. apply a critical familiarity with many of the key texts, secondary literature and cultural products pertaining to applied linguistics
  4. apply advanced reading, analytical and communication skills, both written and verbal to the field of study
  5. demonstrate a thorough understanding of research methodology and ethics, and an ability to undertake a small, independent research project.

Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced applied linguistics studies, Part B. Core master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.

Part A. Foundations for advanced applied linguistics studies (24 points)

These studies will provide an orientation to the field of applied linguistics at graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

Part B. Core master's study (48 points)

These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of applied linguistics practice and research. You will gain a critical understanding of theoretical and practical issues relating to applied linguistics, including second/foreign language acquisition, language teaching, language contact and intercultural communication. Your study will focus on your choice either of applied linguistics or teaching world Englishes for international communication.

Part C. Advanced expertise (24 points)

The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options:

  • a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests.
  • a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this master's course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a discipline cognate to applied linguistics, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

Requirements

The course comprises 96 points structured into three parts: Part A. Foundations for advanced applied linguistics studies (24 points), Part B. Core master's study (48 points) and Part C. Advanced expertise (24 points).

Depending on prior qualifications you may receive entry level credit (a form of block credit) which determines your point of entry to the course:

  • Students admitted at entry level 1 complete 96 points, comprising Part A, Part B and Part C.
  • Students admitted at entry level 2 complete 72 points, comprising Part B and Part C.
  • Students admitted at entry level 3 complete 48 points, comprising Part B.

Note: Students eligible for credit for prior studies may elect not to receive the credit and complete one of the higher credit-point options.

Units are 12 credit points unless otherwise stated.

Part A. Foundations for advanced applied linguistics studies (24 points)

Students complete:

a. one unit (12 points) from the following, taken during the first full time equivalent year of study:

b. one unit (12 points) from those listed in Part C or one of the capstone units in Part B(b).

Part B. Core master's study (48 points)

Students complete:

a. one of the following sets of three units (36 points):

Applied linguistics:

  • APG5043 Language in society
  • APG5046 General linguistics
  • APG5347 Research methods in applied linguistics

Teaching world Englishes for international communication:

  • APG5042 Practices of teaching Englishes for intercultural communication
  • APG5047 Issues in teaching English as an international language
  • APG5347 Research methods in applied linguistics

b. One capstone unit from the following (12 points):

* Students electing to take the research thesis option and APG5856 should consult the course coordinator.

Part C. Advanced expertise (24 points)

Students complete either a. or b. below.

a. The following unit/s:

  • APG5848 Research thesis (24 points)** or APG5849 Research thesis A (12 points) and APG5850 Research thesis B (12 points)**

** Students admitted to the course at entry level 3 who wish to complete this 24 point research thesis should consult with the course coordinator.

b. Two units (24 points) from the following not taken in Part A:

  • APG5349 World Englishes***
  • APG5652 Language and intercultural communication***
  • APG5703 Literacy
  • APG5704 Discourse analysis
  • APG5705 Language and identity
  • APG5875 Introduction to interpreting and translation studies
  • any capstone unit/s not completed in Part B
  • any core units from the alternative specialisation in Part B

*** Students in the stream teaching world Englishes for international communication should include at least one of APG5652 and APG5349 in their choice of electives.

Alternative exits

Students may exit this course early and apply to graduate with one of the following awards, provided they have satisfied the requirements indicated for that award during their enrolment in this master's course:

  • Graduate Certificate in Arts after successful completion of 24 credit points of study with a minimum of 18 credit points at level 4 or above
  • Graduate Diploma in Applied Linguistics after successful completion of 48 credit points of study with a minimum of 36 credit points at level 4 or above.

Progression to further studies

Students entering at entry levels 1 and 2 can complete a research thesis (24 points) that will provide a pathway to a higher degree by research. Students entering at entry level 3 will normally already have an honours degree, however, students in this group who wish to complete a research thesis in applied linguistics should discuss the options with the course coordinator.