Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) and Bachelor of Biomedical Science - 2018

Honours - Course

Commencement year

This course entry applies to students commencing this course in 2018 and should be read in conjunction with information provided in the 'Faculty information' section of this Handbook by the Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences.

Unit codes that are not linked to their entry in the Handbook are not available for study in the current year.

Course code

E3004

Credit points

240

Abbreviated title

BE(Hons)/BBiomedSc

CRICOS code

056482C

Managing faculty

Engineering

Partner faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Admission and fees

Australia

Course progression map

E3004 (pdf)

Course type

Specialist/Specialist
Bachelor/Bachelor

Standard duration

5 years FT, 10 years PT

Students have a maximum of 10 years to complete this course.

Mode and location

On-campus (Clayton)

Award

Bachelor of Biomedical Science

Bachelor of Chemical Engineering (Honours)

Bachelor of Civil Engineering (Honours)

Bachelor of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering (Honours)

Bachelor of Materials Engineering (Honours)

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (Honours)

The engineering award conferred depends on the specialisation completed.

Alternative exits

Students may exit the double degree course with the award for one of the single degrees. Refer to 'Alternative exits' entry below for further requirements and details.

Description

This double degree course in engineering and biomedical science can lead to a rewarding career designing medical technology to improve human lives. Advances in biological sciences and demand for technological solutions are creating new opportunities for engineers. In the next 25 years, engineering will be transformed as it fuses with developments in biomedical science.

Monash University has pioneered this emerging field. Some examples include the Monash Vision Group's work on the bionic eye and our new 4D lung-imaging method. Join our scientists and engineers in developing the latest biomedical innovations and improving lives.

The course lets you to combine one of six engineering disciplines with aspects of anatomy, biochemistry, clinical medicine, epidemiology and preventative medicine, genetics, immunology, microbiology, pharmacology, physiology and psychology. This will give you the skills you need to help solve challenging medical problems.

You will showcase your biomedical and engineering knowledge in a final project and can then choose from an abundance of rewarding and exciting career options.

Structure

Double degree courses include the features of the component degree courses, except that electives may be reduced.

Engineering

E3001 Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) is a specialist course that develops through four themes that combine to underpin engineering practice: fundamentals and foundational skills, design, knowledge and applications, and professional practice.

Part A. Engineering fundamentals and foundational skills

These will develop your understanding of natural and physical sciences, mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, and computer and information sciences that underpin all engineering disciplines.

Part B. Engineering design

This will develop the engineering techniques, tools and resources for the conduct, design and management of engineering design processes and projects, both in the industrial setting and in the development of research experiments.

Part C. Engineering knowledge and application

This will provide in-depth knowledge of the specific engineering methods of a branch of engineering, and will integrate the specific engineering methods and discipline knowledge into practice. You will develop skills to identify and apply knowledge of contextual factors impacting the engineering discipline. Additionally, your studies will focus on your understanding and application of the scope, principles, norms, accountabilities and bounds of contemporary engineering practice in your discipline.

Part D. Professional practice

This will develop your skills in readiness for the engineering workplace. You will develop skills in effective team membership and team leadership, the use and management of commercially relevant data, and the legal responsibilities of engineers. This study will integrate the theme 'Engineering knowledge and application' with your specialist field of engineering.

Biomedical science

M2003 Bachelor of Biomedical Science is a specialist course that provides an interdisciplinary approach to study of biomedical science, with five central themes: molecular and cellular biology, body systems, infection and immunity, disease and society, and diagnostic and research tools. These themes are interwoven in units throughout the course.

Part A. Molecular and cellular biology

Through these studies you will learn how the cell functions and replicates itself in health and disease, particularly considering the structure of the cell and its evolution, the function of cells, DNA, genes and proteins, and the regulation of metabolism.

Part B. Body systems

This theme addresses the principles of major body systems. You will learn how cells come together to form tissues and organs and how they work together in the body to provide it with its metabolic needs and remove waste products. You will study how structure follows function; homeostasis; the nutritional and gastro-intestinal system; the neural system and senses; endocrine, reproductive and renal systems; and cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

Part C. Infection and immunity

The focus of these studies is the functional immune system of multicellular organisms and the disease states that result from pathogen infection and from autoimmunity. You will learn about molecular genetics and recombinant DNA (both important tools for the study of microbial disease and immunity), inflammation and disease, and infection and infection control.

Part D. Disease and society

In these studies you will learn about disease states that result from abnormal function in various body systems, including the cellular, genetic and molecular causes of the disease, with a focus on mechanisms of disease and patterns of disease and treatment. In studying the basis for human disease, you will also consider the societal and personal impacts of past, present and future diseases and the social, economic and environmental factors that are determinants of health.

Part E. Diagnostic and research tools

These studies address both the molecular and cellular tools, including specialist imaging techniques, that can be used to study and diagnose diseases.

Requirements

Students must complete 240 points, of which 144 points are from the Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) (including all of the requirements in Part A, B, C and D for the single degree) and 96 points from the Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including all of the requirements in Part A, B, C, D and E for the single degree

The course progression mapcourse progression map (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2018handbooks/maps/map-e3004.pdf) will assist you to plan to meet the course requirements, and guidance on unit enrolment for each semester of study.

Units are six credit points unless otherwise stated.

Alternative exits

Students may be eligible to exit the double degree program and graduate with either a Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) named degree or a Bachelor of Biomedical Science after four or three years respectively, depending on the units studied.

Students who wish to graduate with a Bachelor of Engineering degree prior to the completion of the double degree must have completed at least 192 points of studies, including all of the requirements in Part A, B, C and D for the particular engineering specialisation.

Students who wish to graduate with a Bachelor of Biomedical Science prior to the completion of the double degree must have completed at least 144 points of studies, including all of the requirements in Part A, B, C, D and E for the Bachelor of Biomedical Science degree.